Heartburn Specialist in Kentucky

Over 30 Years of Chronic Heartburn Treatment in Salem, KY

Acid reflux is a problem most people experience at some point in their lives, but when it becomes chronic, it’s necessary to see a specialist like Dr. William Barnes at Tri-Rivers Healthcare in Salem and Marion Kentucky. Chronic acid reflux, or GERD, is a potentially serious digestive issue that can lead to complications such as esophageal stricture or ulcers. In its severe form, acid reflux might even require surgical intervention. That’s why it’s important to see Heartburn Specialist Dr. William Barnes as soon as possible if you have chronic heartburn.

What is Heartburn?

With a normal, healthy person, after swallowing, a valve between the esophagus and the stomach opens to allow food to pass, then it closes to prevent stomach fluids from backwashing, or “refluxing,” back up into the esophagus. For people with GERD, this valve has become dysfunctional and cannot close, allowing stomach fluids, both acid and non-acid, to backwash up into the esophagus. Non-acid reflux can be as harmful to the esophagus as acid reflux and can cause similar symptoms.

Some reflux is normal, but if you suffer symptoms of reflux more than twice a week, you may have GERD. Call Tri-Rivers Healthcare at (270) 988-3298 for a GERD evaluation.

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What Causes the Valve to Become Dysfunctional?

  • Congenital: Though pediatric GERD is not uncommon, most children either outgrow it or are treated effectively for it as infants.
  • Injury to Upper Chest: Typically the result of a sports-related injury (e.g., high school football injury) or a traumatic accident (e.g., seat-belt injury resulting from car accident). The injury causes the valve to “stretch” out of shape.
  • Obesity/Diet: Weight can be a significant contributing factor.
  • Age: As people age, their musculature can lose its integrity.

Is My Reflux Normal or Something More Serious?

GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) is more commonly known as chronic acid reflux disease. It is estimated that more than 23 million Americans suffer from the symptoms of GERD. GERD is caused by anatomical changes that result in the body’s natural antireflux barrier becoming dysfunctional, allowing stomach fluids to backwash up, or “reflux,” into the esophagus (the tube that carries food from your throat to your stomach), exposing the esophagus to gastric acid.

What Are the Symptoms of GERD?

While heartburn is the most common symptom, there are many other symptoms, both acid-related and non-acid-related. Most GERD sufferers attribute their symptoms to acid reflux, but reflux of non-acid stomach fluids can cause similar symptoms and can be just as harmful to the esophagus.

Typical symptoms include:

  • Heartburn
  • Excessive salivation (waterbrash)
  • Belching
  • Bloating
  • Pain or discomfort in the chest
  • Reflux-related sleep disorders
  • Yellow fluid or stains on pillow after sleep
  • Intolerance of certain foods and liquids

Atypical symptoms can include:

  • Regurgitation
  • Hoarseness or laryngitis
  • Frequent swallowing
  • Asthma or asthma-like symptoms
  • Excessive clearing of the throat
  • Persistent cough
  • Burning in the mouth or throat (acid taste in the mouth)
  • Dental erosions or therapy-resistant gum disease or inflammation
  • Discomfort in the ears and nose